507-332-0716Faribault: 507-332-0716
507-214-7387Owatonna: 507-214-7387
1200 Lyndale Ave., N, Faribault, MN 55021
1220 Frontage Road East, Owatonna, MN 55060

Heartland Animal Hospital Blog

Have a Not-So-Scary October

2020-10-12

2020 has been scary enough, so there’s no need for any extra worries this year. To help keep your pets safe this October, we’re offering you our top tricks to keeping the treat in this sweet month.

1. Chocolate, Raisins, and Xylitol

When it comes to trick-or-treating goodies, keep them out of paw’s reach. You likely know that chocolate is poisonous to pups, but did you know that raisins and xylitol, a sugar substitute, are too? It’s true.

What else should every pup parent know about these not-so-sweet treats? There’s no way to predict how sensitive a dog will be to grapes and raisins. Some become extremely ill by eating just a couple of small berries, while others don’t react to them at all. If your neighbors insist on giving out those tiny boxes of raisins, don’t risk having them raided by your dog: raisin poisoning can cause liver failure.

Xylitol is a sweetener typically found in gum and gummies. It’s highly toxic to dogs and can cause them to become very ill, very fast. If a canine consumes this sugar replacement, it can cause permanent organ damage and even be fatal.

What about chocolate? The darker, the more dangerous, but any amount of chocolate can be too hazardous for dogs to eat.

What should you do if your dog eats any of these substances? Give us a call and immediately.

2. Keep Your Pets Away from the Door

Why shouldn’t your pets crowd the door as trick-or-treaters come to make their demands? Your dog or cat may be scared of the costumes, and the noise and excitement of visitors can make pets nervous.

When pets are anxious, escaping out of the front door looks awfully appealing. This is why many cats and dogs wind up at the shelter on Halloween night, a very spooky place for any pet.

Did you adopt a COVID puppy or kitty? Be sure your pet has a shiny new ID tag and consider microchipping them if you haven’t yet done so. If your pet already has a chip, make sure it’s up-to-date with your information.

3. Jack-O-Lanterns and Candles Can Be a Spooky Problem

Many newly-adopted dogs and cats are still learning about the human world, and some lessons can get them into trouble. Even pets that have been with you for years can find themselves in precarious situations during this season.

Something as simple as burning candles and displaying a jack-o-lantern can be a Halloween hazard for pets. For example, while cooked pumpkin is beneficial for dogs to eat, your pup won’t know your carved pumpkin isn’t dinner and may take a nibble of a raw one, go overboard, and get sick. Fall is also when we frequently hear about candles causing burns to pets and even starting fires.

To keep your pet safe, choose battery-powered candles, and keep your jack-o-lantern away from curious noses.

4. Planning to Dress Your Pet in a Cute Costume?

We love all the silly and adorable pet costumes that are popular these days. While these get-ups are cute, they can also become dangerous for pets.

Doggie or kitty dress-up is a great activity when the outfit fits appropriately and doesn’t have choking hazards, but even so, never leave your pet unattended while they are wearing a costume. When wrestling to get garments off, pets can get tangled in ties or pull off buttons, which can quickly become a choking hazard.

When dressing your senior pet, be sure to be gentle. Stretching your pet’s limbs can be painful for pups and cats with arthritis or joint pain.

5. Keep Your Pet Safe from Fall Decor and More

Decorating for Halloween is one of the most fun activities this time of year. As much as we love the aesthetic, dried corn, winter gourds, themed wreaths, and spooky webs or ribbons can create intestinal blockages if a pet eats them. Try to keep these decorations up high on walls or doors, so nobody nibbles them.

Electric cords connected to outdoor inflatables and other decorations can cause severe burns if a curious pet bites into one, and are a fire hazard if they get chewed. Keep cords taped down or secured far from your pet.

Have a Not-So-Scary Halloween This Year!

Have a safe, happy Howl-o-ween! We hope your pet has a warm and cozy fall season. If you need a little help keeping the creepy crawling parasites we see this time of year from coming indoors with your companion, make an appointment to see us today. It’s always a treat to see you and your pet!

Categories

Recent Posts

Have a Not-So-Scary October

2020 has been scary enough, so there’s no need for any extra worries this year. To help keep your pets safe this October, we’re offering you our top tricks to keeping the treat in this sweet month.

Read More
3 Hidden Signs of Pet Pain - Is Your Pet Trying to Tell You Something?

Pain and your pet: two things you never want to think about together. When our pets hurt, our hearts break. We do everything we can to help our beloved companions avoid the irritation and anguish of physical discomfort. Yet it can be challenging to recognize how your pet experiences pain and exhibits distress. It would be so much easier if our furry family members spoke human!

Read More
Caring for Your Pet Locally is Caring for Your Community

We’re proud to be part of this diverse and caring community. We are equally honored to be a local business that makes an impact on the happiness and health of your furry family members.

During these trying times, we have remained open to provide pets with the medical care they need. To prioritize the health and safety of your family, we’re offering new services like curbside pickup and consultations over the phone. We’re proud to continue to serve you and provide critical veterinary services to our community.

As the effects of COVID-19 provide challenges to small businesses, choosing local providers for your purchases and services is vital to our area’s economy. If you’re thankful for being part of this community, we hope you’ll keep your shopping trips local as a way of caring for our region.

Why Use Small Businesses and Why Shop Local?

When you patronize local small businesses, you improve our community. How? Shopping locally increases employment opportunities, provides better wages to employees, and keeps your money benefiting our community through taxes and employee payroll.

What Can You Do to Increase Your Local Impact as a Pet Owner?

1. Provide Your Pet with Veterinary Care from a Small Business

We know many people are choosing which services and errands to go without due to COVID. Providing your pet with veterinary care is not something to skip. Nobody knows how long this pandemic will last, and postponing your pet’s appointments could be disastrous.

Bringing your pet in for their regular check-up or a health concern helps us continue to maintain our staff and helps your pet. Early diagnosis increases the effectiveness of treatment and often decreases the medical intervention needed. Preventative medicine and regular exams reduce your vet bills in the long run and improve your pet’s prognosis should they fall ill.

Don’t remember the last time your pet was vaccinated? August is National Immunization Month, so it’s a good time to check if your companion is due for these vital vaccinations to help keep them healthy.

2. Let Us Fill Your Pet’s Prescriptions Instead of a Big-Box

One often-overlooked opportunity to keep your dollars in our community is to fill your pet’s prescriptions at our office. Studies show that using a big-box retailer can hamper local economic growth. If you go elsewhere for your pet’s medicine, including heartworm, flea, and tick prevention, we hope you’ll consider transferring their prescription to us. We offer convenient means to fill your pet’s Rx, provide you with advice and guidance, and are a trusted source for your pet’s medications.

3. Don’t Skip Veterinary Care for Your Cat

Did you know that August 22nd is Bring Your Cat to the Vet Day? Make an appointment to support your cat’s health and a local veterinarian. Cats often go longer than dogs without visiting the vet, because they often seem more self-sufficient but, in fact, are really masters of hiding pain and discomfort. If it’s been a while since your cat had an exam, make an appointment to bring them in.

4. Follow Us on Social Media & Share Posts

Following our practice and other local pet-related businesses on social media is one easy way to pay it forward without spending any money. If you like one of our posts, why not share it with your network? We appreciate those who spread information that improves the lives of pets beyond our reach, and social media is a way to connect your friends and family to a great local business.

5. Refer a Friend to Our Office

The power of word-of-mouth has never waned. If you have a friend or family member looking for veterinary care, we hope you’ll send them to us. We appreciate your referrals and love meeting new people and their pets. Plus, your friend will appreciate the peace of mind of knowing their pet will be cared for by people you already trust.

6. Review Us Online

We hope you’ll take the time to review us and other small local businesses on Google and Facebook. Your positive experience can help a pet parent looking for quality care. Taking a moment to tell your neighbors about why you trust us with your pet’s health highlights a local business and keeps our community ties strong.

Thank You for Choosing Us to Care for Your Pets

Struggling retailers, caring providers, and your favorite restaurants need you now more than ever. We love this community: the people, the pets, and the spirit, and we hope to see it thrive in the face of adversity. You’re in our hearts and on our minds. Stay safe and healthy, and we hope to see you soon.

Read More

Quality, Compassionate Medicine

Our Mission at Heartland Animal Hospital is to provide quality, compassionate medicine. Locations in Faribault, MN 507-332-0716 and Owatonna 507-214-7387.

Request Your Pet’s Appointment